9C.1 part c

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Jeril Joseph 1B
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9C.1 part c

Postby Jeril Joseph 1B » Mon Jul 22, 2019 10:10 pm

So, the ion in question is [Co(CN)5(OH2)]2-. I know how to get the oxidation number, but I don't get why in this case you add an -ate to the end of cobalt when naming the ion. Is it because of the water?

Jeril Joseph 1B
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Re: 9C.1 part c

Postby Jeril Joseph 1B » Mon Jul 22, 2019 10:28 pm

Oh!!! I figured it out. If the coordinate complex has a negative net charge, you add the -ate. That makes sense now.

Leah farhadi 1F
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Re: 9C.1 part c

Postby Leah farhadi 1F » Tue Jul 23, 2019 10:18 am

There is also a rule that if iron is the central metal and it’s an anion, then you would use Ferrate.

Chem_Mod
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Re: 9C.1 part c

Postby Chem_Mod » Tue Jul 23, 2019 1:34 pm

If the complex ion is an anion, the name of the metal ends with the suffix -ate. For example, Co in a complex anion is called cobaltate and Pt is called platinate. For some metals, Latin names are used in the complex anions. For example, Fe is called ferrate (not ironate).

Bella Martin
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Re: 9C.1 part c

Postby Bella Martin » Wed Jul 31, 2019 9:21 am

does the same rule apply if the compound within the brackets is negative, but the outer metal is positive enough to balance it out? would you still use -ate?


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