Avogadro's Number  [ENDORSED]

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Sarah Blake-2I
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Avogadro's Number

Postby Sarah Blake-2I » Tue Oct 01, 2019 5:02 pm

I was wondering in what situations do we use Avogadro's number? I am just a bit confused on what it is used for and how to use it after it was used in a practice problem (E-11) in my discussion today.

Vincent Leong 2B
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Re: Avogadro's Number  [ENDORSED]

Postby Vincent Leong 2B » Tue Oct 01, 2019 5:05 pm

As far as I know, Avogrado's Number is most commonly used to find the amount of molecules/atoms in a mol of a substance. By it's formal definition, the constant itself is the number of units in one mol of any substance where the units may be electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. If you did practice problems in Fundamentals section A or B, the constant can be used in many varying context but is most commonly used to find the amount of atoms or molecules in chemistry at least.

LNgo 1G
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby LNgo 1G » Tue Oct 01, 2019 5:15 pm

You use Avogadro's number when you are trying to find the number of particles, atoms, or formula units of a substance.

Aayush Patel 3B
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Aayush Patel 3B » Tue Oct 01, 2019 6:24 pm

A good example of when to use avogadro's number can be seen in example E.1 in the textbook. The number of hydrogen atoms is given in a sample, 1.29 X 10^24 H atoms. The questions wants to know how many moles of hydrogen atoms can be stored in a hydrogen storage device. Avogadro's number comes into play when the number of hydrogen atoms is divided by the constant, because 1 mole has 6.0221 X 10^23 of something, and in this case it is atoms. The final answer is then given in moles, 2.14 mol H.

Minh Ngo 4G
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Minh Ngo 4G » Tue Oct 01, 2019 6:39 pm

Avogadro’s number is just a quantity of something. You would typically use it to determine how many atoms are there in a compound or such like that. Since 1 mole is equal to 6.022 x10^23, you can use the number of moles you have to determine how many atoms are in that substance

Jada Brown 2H
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Jada Brown 2H » Tue Oct 01, 2019 8:03 pm

Avogadro's number is used to describe a quantity of something. It is similar to the concept of a "dozen" except instead of referring to 12 of something, it refers to 6.022*10^23 of something. It is used when converting to/from moles to/from a number of molecules, formula units or atoms, among other things.

Nicholas_Gladkov_2J
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Nicholas_Gladkov_2J » Tue Oct 01, 2019 8:44 pm

Think of 6.022x10^23 as the amount of "things" in a mole. If you have 6.022x10^23 cats you have a mole of cats. If you have 6.022x10^23 voles (a gopher-like animal) , you have a mole of voles. So, if they ask how many molecules of let's say CO2 in 4 moles, multiply 4 by 6.022x10^23, and there you go.

Daniel Martinez 1k
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Daniel Martinez 1k » Tue Oct 01, 2019 9:16 pm

Avogadro's number is 6.0221 x 10^23. It is used to find the number of atoms, molecules, or ions in a mole of any substance.

emma brinton_3B
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby emma brinton_3B » Tue Oct 01, 2019 9:23 pm

Avogadro's number, 6.0221 x 10^23, is used in order to calculate the amount of particles within a certain mass of a substance.

Megan Ngai- 3B
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Megan Ngai- 3B » Tue Oct 01, 2019 11:01 pm

When you want to convert from moles to atoms, you multiply the molar amount by Avogadro’s number.
When you want to convert from atoms to moles, divide the atom amount by Avogadro’s number.

Patricia Chan 1C
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Patricia Chan 1C » Wed Oct 02, 2019 12:00 am

You want to use Avogadro's Number in order to convert mols into atoms, molecules, or formula units. If the question wants you to do this, it will specify that they are looking for such units (atoms, molecules, formula units etc).

605379296
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby 605379296 » Wed Oct 02, 2019 1:00 am

You use Avogadro’s number when you want to covert moles into atoms. For example, when you’re given a certain number of grams, like 500 grams of NaCl, you would divide this number by the molar mass of NaCl. Then, you take the number of moles in NaCl and multiply by Avogadro’s number to get the number of atoms present.

Joanne Lee 1J
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Joanne Lee 1J » Wed Oct 02, 2019 1:01 am

If I am not mistaken, you use Avogadro's Number to find the number of atoms, molecules, or formula units when you are given the number of moles of any substance.


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