Electron Configurations

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salvadorramos3k
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Electron Configurations

Postby salvadorramos3k » Tue Oct 22, 2019 10:41 pm

Hi can somebody please explain to me how you know the order when writing an electron configuration? For example, 1s, 2s, 2p....Is there a trick to remember the order? Also, how do you know how many electrons will fit in that orbital? Let me know if I have to clarify any parts of the question. Thank you :)

Sophia Shaka 3L
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Re: Electron Configurations

Postby Sophia Shaka 3L » Tue Oct 22, 2019 11:14 pm

The 'trick' would probably just be having a copy of the periodic table handy, as if you know where the s- and p- blocks are, it is easy to see which subshells fill up before the others. Also, since the order is always the same, a bit of practice will make the order seem more intuitive, but you can always go back to the periodic table and count it out using the rows and columns. As for orbitals, there are ALWAYS only 2 electrons per orbital. This is part of the Pauli Exclusion Principle, because in each orbital, there is one electron with "spin up" and one with "spin down". The s subshell has 1 orbital, the p subshell has 3 orbitals (x, y, z), etc.

Brooke Yasuda 2J
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Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Electron Configurations

Postby Brooke Yasuda 2J » Wed Oct 23, 2019 12:10 am

Yeah, look at the periodic table. But also, you can just know certain facts like when n = 1, there is only the s subshell. For n = 2, there is only the s and p subshell. for n = 3, there are s, p, and d subshells, and so on. And when writing electron configurations, you always write in the order of s, p, d, f

A Raab 1K
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Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Electron Configurations

Postby A Raab 1K » Wed Oct 23, 2019 12:35 am

To add on the information already provided, the order goes s, p, d, f. For s, there's a maximum of 2 electrons; for p there's 6; for d there's 10 and for f there's 14. Hope that helps when you write it out.

Kavya Immadisetty 2B
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Re: Electron Configurations

Postby Kavya Immadisetty 2B » Wed Oct 23, 2019 12:43 am

The easiest way is to use the periodic table but you can also use this chat:
Image

Sara Richmond 2K
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Re: Electron Configurations

Postby Sara Richmond 2K » Wed Oct 23, 2019 5:27 pm

Hey the order of electron shell energy is difficult to understand. The only way that I can remember the order of the energy is with this chart. Follow the arrows from bottom to top and then return to the bottom of the next arrow.
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Jorge Ramirez_4H
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Re: Electron Configurations

Postby Jorge Ramirez_4H » Wed Oct 23, 2019 8:16 pm

What does he mean when he writes x, y, and z during electron configuration? Is that necessary?

Ryan Chang 1C
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Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Electron Configurations

Postby Ryan Chang 1C » Wed Oct 23, 2019 11:33 pm

Jorge Ramirez_4H wrote:What does he mean when he writes x, y, and z during electron configuration? Is that necessary?


x, y, and z represent the different orbital orientations. Some orbitals may be lined up along x axis, others along the y axis, and others along the z axis. The reason why you write x, y, or z is to specify the orbital orientation.

Caroline Zepecki
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Re: Electron Configurations

Postby Caroline Zepecki » Thu Oct 24, 2019 9:29 am

It's important that you memorize the different groups while looking at the periodic table. The lefthand side has the s groups, the middle the d groups, and the right side the p groups. Then, the constant that determines which orbital it is corresponds to the period # (for s and p groups) and period value -1 for the d group.

Jasmine Fendi 1D
Posts: 108
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Electron Configurations

Postby Jasmine Fendi 1D » Thu Oct 24, 2019 10:27 am

Hi, can someone please further explain the exception for the electron configuration for 3d and 4s? especially for the elements Cr and Cu?

Thank you!

emma brinton_3B
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Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Electron Configurations

Postby emma brinton_3B » Thu Oct 24, 2019 10:31 am

Hi! i would just recommend copying this chart whenever you come across a question asking for the electron configuration of an element
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vDODkJSSR5WNKHoXDjJL_Electron_Configuration.jpg

Nathan Nakaguchi 1G
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Re: Electron Configurations

Postby Nathan Nakaguchi 1G » Thu Oct 24, 2019 11:20 am

For me, I don't memorize the order I just have memorized the exceptions like when you get to Cr the D shell can have 10 electrons and Cu's 4s shell can only hold 1 electron. The main thing I try to do when finding electron configuration is to build up from the shells (counting the electrons) and to not get confused I just remember that the energy levels must go in increasing order which is why 3d shell comes before the 4s shell (n=3 for d and n=4 for s).

Jorge Ramirez_4H
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Re: Electron Configurations

Postby Jorge Ramirez_4H » Thu Nov 07, 2019 2:21 pm

Is there an easy way to memorize the quantum numbers?

Bradley Whitworth 4B
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Re: Electron Configurations

Postby Bradley Whitworth 4B » Sun Nov 10, 2019 3:27 pm

The way lavelle has us writing it is in order of which electrons will ionize last to the ones that'll ionize first which basically means you write the configuration in order of the principle quantum number which for this class means you need to know that 3d^10 would be listed before 4s^2 in an electron configuration.


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