Definition

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Gabriel Ordonez 2K
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Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Definition

Postby Gabriel Ordonez 2K » Sun Nov 03, 2019 4:38 pm

I don't really understand the concept behind a coordinate covalent bond. Professor Lavelle skimmed through it during my lecture. Could someone explain this concept to a greater extent and apply it through an example? Thank you!

Sydney Jacobs 1C
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Re: Definition

Postby Sydney Jacobs 1C » Sun Nov 03, 2019 4:45 pm

A coordinate covalent bond is a bond in which both electrons come from one of the atoms. For example, when boron trifluoride reacts with ammonia, the lone pair on ammonia completes boron's octet. Both electrons needed to complete boron's octet come from ammonia, rather than some coming from boron and some from ammonia, therefore making it a coordinate covalent bond.

Sofia Barker 2C
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Re: Definition

Postby Sofia Barker 2C » Sun Nov 03, 2019 5:59 pm

Coordinate covalent bonds are bonds in which the electrons being shared come from the same atom. In a typical covalent bond, such as the bond between two H atoms, each atom provides one electron that both of the atoms can share to fill their 1s shells. In a coordinate covalent bond, such as the bond between ammonia and H+, the nitrogen in ammonia has two lone pair electrons that are shared with the electron-less H+. In this bond, H+ provides none of the electrons while N provides two for the bond.

Sadhana_Dicussion_4A
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Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:19 am

Re: Definition

Postby Sadhana_Dicussion_4A » Sun Nov 03, 2019 6:05 pm

A coordinate covalent bond is a type of covalent bond where the two bonding electrons come from the same atom. In a regular covalent bond, each of the atoms that are forming the bond donate an electron to form the bond.

805307623
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Re: Definition

Postby 805307623 » Sun Nov 03, 2019 6:16 pm

A coordinate covalent bond is formed when one atom provides both electrons in a shared pair.

cassidysong 1K
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Re: Definition

Postby cassidysong 1K » Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:44 pm

A coordinate covalent bond is when one atom shares both pairs of electrons.

Jiapeng Han 3A
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:50 pm

Re: Definition

Postby Jiapeng Han 3A » Sat Nov 07, 2020 1:04 am

A coordinate bond is formed when one atom donates a lone pair of electrons to an empty orbital of another atom. For example, an ammonia molecule has a lone pair of electron on the N atom, and a hydrogen ion has an empty orbital. As a result, the N atom donates the lone pair of electron to the hydrogen ion so that a covalent bond is formed, the final product is then ammonium ion--NH4+.

Joshua Swift
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:50 pm

Re: Definition

Postby Joshua Swift » Sun Nov 08, 2020 4:00 pm

A coordinate covalent bond is when one element provides both of the electrons necessary in creating the bond.

Aliya Roserie 3I
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Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Definition

Postby Aliya Roserie 3I » Sun Nov 08, 2020 4:03 pm

Hello! I think its really important to know that covalent bonds share electrons, this is what separates the difference between ionic and covalent interactions with other electrons.

Lauren Strickland 2a
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Re: Definition

Postby Lauren Strickland 2a » Sun Nov 08, 2020 4:07 pm

A coordinate covalent bond is when one element supplies both electrons for creating a bond.

Can Yilgor 1D
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Re: Definition

Postby Can Yilgor 1D » Sun Nov 08, 2020 4:10 pm

A coordinate bond (also called a dative covalent bond) is a covalent bond (a shared pair of electrons) in which both electrons come from the same atom. A covalent bond is formed by two atoms sharing a pair of electrons. The atoms are held together because the electron pair is attracted by both of the nuclei. In the formation of a simple covalent bond, each atom supplies one electron to the bond, but that does not have to be the case.

Madison Muggeo 1G
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:35 pm

Re: Definition

Postby Madison Muggeo 1G » Sun Nov 08, 2020 7:07 pm

Coordinate covalent bonds are when one atom donates both electrons to form a bond, such as a Lewis base.

Caelin Brenninkmeijer 1H
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:50 pm

Re: Definition

Postby Caelin Brenninkmeijer 1H » Sun Nov 08, 2020 7:17 pm

A coordinate covalent bond is when two electrons from the same atom form a covalent bond.

Chance Herbert 1A
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Re: Definition

Postby Chance Herbert 1A » Sun Nov 08, 2020 7:19 pm

Coordinate covalent bonds exist when one atom shares two of its own valence electrons with another atom to form a covalent bond.

Chance Herbert 1A
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:55 pm

Re: Definition

Postby Chance Herbert 1A » Sun Nov 08, 2020 7:20 pm

Coordinate covalent bonds exist when one atom shares two of its own valence electrons with another atom to form a covalent bond.

Jaden Joodi 3A
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:31 pm

Re: Definition

Postby Jaden Joodi 3A » Sun Nov 08, 2020 7:28 pm

After reading some on the replies, I would like to ask the follow-up question: How can we know if a compound receives its needed electrons solely from another compound?

Nicoli Peiris 2J
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:02 pm

Re: Definition

Postby Nicoli Peiris 2J » Mon Nov 09, 2020 12:44 pm

Coordinate covalent bond is the bond that forms between a lewis acid and a lewis base. This bond is unique as the lewis base donates TWO its electrons to from the bond. This is why a coordinate covalent bond is noted specially rather than just as a normal bond.

DPatel_2L
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:41 pm

Re: Definition

Postby DPatel_2L » Sun Nov 15, 2020 5:18 pm

A coordinate covalent bond is when one atom shares both of the elections needed


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