A different way

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

905174774
Posts: 52
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

A different way

Postby 905174774 » Thu Nov 14, 2019 7:34 pm

The only way I know to find the limiting reagent is to do the picket fences and see how much of the product is produced from each separate reactant. However, it does get kind of confusing. Is there any other way to find the limiting reagent that is more straight forward/ easier?

Tiffany_Chen 2K
Posts: 106
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:15 am

Re: A different way

Postby Tiffany_Chen 2K » Thu Nov 14, 2019 9:53 pm

I would say that's the most efficient and clearest way to do limiting reactant problems for this class.

Melvin Reputana 1L
Posts: 55
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:16 am

Re: A different way

Postby Melvin Reputana 1L » Sat Nov 16, 2019 12:24 am

I also believe that is the most straight forward way. I think a good way to help you process limiting reagent problems is to list what you're given and what you're trying to find. Then compare to see which reactant produces the least amount of product which means that specific reactant is what's limiting the reaction from going into completion.

Tiffany Vo 3G
Posts: 52
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: A different way

Postby Tiffany Vo 3G » Sat Nov 16, 2019 12:38 am

If given the grams of reactants, you can technically convert each reactant to moles and then convert one of the reactants to moles of the other reactant and use the coefficients in the chemical equation to determine the limiting reactant. So for instance, if you have 2H2 + O2 --> 2H2O and you find that you have 3 moles of H2 and 1 mole of O2, you'd use the equation and determine that the O2 was the limiting reagent because the molar ratio in the chemical equation is 2 mole of H2 to 1 mole of O2. I don't know if that's easier necessarily, but it is technically another way that you could calculate limiting reagents.

Amanda Lin 2I
Posts: 101
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: A different way

Postby Amanda Lin 2I » Sat Nov 16, 2019 12:50 am

That is probably the most efficient way because limiting reactant problems often ask for the theoretical yield of the product.

Anokhi Patel 2B
Posts: 76
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: A different way

Postby Anokhi Patel 2B » Sun Dec 08, 2019 9:14 pm

This method is very efficient, but you can also compare the moles of the reactant and then use the ratio to compare limiting reactants.

Claire Grover 3G
Posts: 64
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am

Re: A different way

Postby Claire Grover 3G » Sun Dec 08, 2019 9:33 pm

I consider that to be the best way to do it, but I'm not sure.

Hussain Chharawalla 1G
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: A different way

Postby Hussain Chharawalla 1G » Sun Dec 08, 2019 10:26 pm

Also remember to always look at molar ratios when looking for the limiting reactant. This is a common mistake.

Amanda Mei 1B
Posts: 109
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:16 am

Re: A different way

Postby Amanda Mei 1B » Sun Dec 08, 2019 10:39 pm

I think this is the best way to do it since many problems ask you how much product will be formed anyway, so you're essentially answering that question while you determine the limiting reactant. Just convert moles of each reactant to moles of the product you'll be looking for.


Return to “Limiting Reactant Calculations”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests