Bronsted acids

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Cassidy Kohlenberger 3D
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Bronsted acids

Postby Cassidy Kohlenberger 3D » Sat Nov 23, 2019 2:54 pm

Can someone explain/summarize what we need to know about Bronsted acids? I was kinda confused when he went over them in lecture on Friday.

vpena_1I
Posts: 109
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Bronsted acids

Postby vpena_1I » Sat Nov 23, 2019 3:11 pm

A Bronsted acid is an H+ donor (proton donor), and a bronsted base is an H+ acceptor (proton acceptor). In order for a bronsted base to accept an H+ ion, it uses its lone pair of electrons to bind to it. You can then see the connection between a bronsted base and a Lewis base (<- electron pair donor). Both are essentially the same, but they have different definitions, and some compounds can be considered one without being considered the other.

Kayla Maldonado 1C
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Re: Bronsted acids

Postby Kayla Maldonado 1C » Sat Nov 23, 2019 3:32 pm

vpena_1I wrote:A Bronsted acid is an H+ donor (proton donor), and a bronsted base is an H+ acceptor (proton acceptor). In order for a bronsted base to accept an H+ ion, it uses its lone pair of electrons to bind to it. You can then see the connection between a bronsted base and a Lewis base (<- electron pair donor). Both are essentially the same, but they have different definitions, and some compounds can be considered one without being considered the other.

What's the difference between a bronsted base and a Lewis base? How do we know if a compound is one or the other?

vpena_1I
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Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Bronsted acids

Postby vpena_1I » Sat Nov 23, 2019 11:52 pm

A Bronsted base is a proton acceptor, a Lewis base is an electron pair donor. All bronsted bases are Lewis bases, but not all Lewis bases are bronsted bases. The reason for this being that a Lewis base can donate its electrons to a number of cations, not just to H+. You can figure out what's what by looking at a chemical equation and seeing if H is involved in the reaction or not.

Kaitlyn Jang 1F
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Bronsted acids

Postby Kaitlyn Jang 1F » Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:08 pm

By definition, bronsted acids donate protons and bronsted gases accept protons. When an acid and base react in an equation, the acid has a conjugate base that accepts its proton, and the base has a conjugate acid that forms when the base accepts the proton.

Ian Morris 3C
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Re: Bronsted acids

Postby Ian Morris 3C » Sun Nov 24, 2019 8:52 pm

So would it be Bronsted Acid + Bronsted Base -> Conjugate Acid + Conjugate Base?


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