Net Ionic Equations

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Labiba Sardar 2A
Posts: 103
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Net Ionic Equations

Postby Labiba Sardar 2A » Sat Nov 30, 2019 11:45 am

When writing net ionic equations, how do you know which molecules will be written as ions and which molecule(s) will be written together (not as ions)?

Prasanna Padmanabham 4I
Posts: 111
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Net Ionic Equations

Postby Prasanna Padmanabham 4I » Sat Nov 30, 2019 11:55 am

Do you have a specific example or a specific problem you are stuck on? I'm not quite sure how to answer your question broadly...

Deepika Reddy 1A
Posts: 125
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Net Ionic Equations

Postby Deepika Reddy 1A » Sat Nov 30, 2019 12:03 pm

I believe that you would have to know the solubility rules. If something is soluble, then it shows up as ions. If the solubility rules says that a molecule or compound is not soluble, then the molecule or compound is written together and not dissociated into ions.

Labiba Sardar 2A
Posts: 103
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Net Ionic Equations

Postby Labiba Sardar 2A » Sat Nov 30, 2019 12:05 pm

For example, in 17b) under Fundamentals J, it asks to write the chemical reaction for when KClO reacts with H2O. The reaction looks like...
ClO- + H2O --> HClO + OH-
In this example, why are H2O and HClO not written as ions?

faithkim1L
Posts: 105
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Net Ionic Equations

Postby faithkim1L » Sat Nov 30, 2019 12:07 pm

There are solubility rules that help you identify which ones will dissociate in water and become aqueous, and those that will not. The best way to know is just to memorize the solubility rules. It was mandatory in HS AP Chem to know them, but I'm not sure if Lavelle will have us memorize them too.

philipraj_1F
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Net Ionic Equations

Postby philipraj_1F » Sat Nov 30, 2019 1:27 pm

If it can dissolve into ions, you must represent it as ions (so covalent molecules stay how they are) and it is net it must be simplified to show only the ions that change in a reaction.


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