R in PV=nRT


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sallina_yehdego 2E
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R in PV=nRT

Postby sallina_yehdego 2E » Mon Jan 07, 2019 11:10 pm

What does the R represent in the equation PV=nRT? and what are the units?

Jesse Kuehn 1B
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Jesse Kuehn 1B » Mon Jan 07, 2019 11:17 pm

It is the called the gas constant and the SI unit for it is J K^-1 mol^-1

Nathan Tran 4K
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Nathan Tran 4K » Mon Jan 07, 2019 11:57 pm

It's essentially a constant usually equal to 8.315 JK^-1mol^-1. I am sure it will be on our constant sheet.

Matthew Tran 1H
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Matthew Tran 1H » Tue Jan 08, 2019 12:05 am

Depending on the units of pressure and volume, R can take on different values. A common example is when you are given P in atm (atmospheres) and V in L (liters). In this case R=0.0821(atm*L)/(mol*K)

JiangJC Dis2K
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby JiangJC Dis2K » Tue Jan 08, 2019 5:02 pm

R is a constant in the ideal gas law (PV=nRT) and has multiple unit derrivations that can all be found on the equations and constants sheet! So no need to memorize the value or units!

Emily Ng_4C
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Emily Ng_4C » Tue Jan 08, 2019 5:22 pm

R is the gas constant and it is important to note that it differs depending on whether atm, torr, or bar is used for the pressure unit.

Felicia1E
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Felicia1E » Tue Jan 08, 2019 6:04 pm

Different problems will have different units, so as long as you match the unit to the corresponding R value you should be good. Here is a list with some R values:

0.0821 (atm L)/(mol K)
0.0831 (bar L)/(mol K)
8.314 (J)/(K mol)
62.36 (torr L)/(mol K) or (mmHg L)/(mol K)
1.987 (cal)/ (mol K)

Millicent Navarro 1I
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Millicent Navarro 1I » Mon Jan 14, 2019 2:57 pm

PV=nRT is the Ideal Gas Law equation. To answer your question, the R is the ideal gas law constant and there are varying corresponding values (for the most part, problems will specify which value to use.) Some examples can include bar or atm.

705170809
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby 705170809 » Mon Jan 14, 2019 3:10 pm

R is gas constant, but the units can be different like atm, torr, or bar.

Brian Hom 2F
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Brian Hom 2F » Mon Jan 14, 2019 3:19 pm

The ideal gas law is PV = nRT, where n is the number of moles, and R is universal gas constant. The value of R depends on the units involved, but is usually stated with S.I. units as: R = 8.314 J/mol. It is just a constant to use in the equation.

Ahmed Mahmood 4D
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Ahmed Mahmood 4D » Mon Jan 14, 2019 9:27 pm

R is a constant known as the gas constant. Its units are represented as Joules . mol^-1 and various other units such as atmospheres.

ran2000
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby ran2000 » Wed Jan 16, 2019 1:00 pm

R is the ideal gas constant 8.314 J/(K mol)

Eva Zhao 4I
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Eva Zhao 4I » Thu Jan 09, 2020 9:05 pm

R is the universal gas constant, sometimes known as the Regnault constant. The value of the R constant is 8.3144598 J/mol·K.

Lizette Noriega 1H
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Lizette Noriega 1H » Thu Jan 09, 2020 9:13 pm

R is the gas constant but it can use different units such as torr, atm, or bar

VLi_2B
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby VLi_2B » Fri Jan 10, 2020 3:49 pm

Dr. Lavelle's website also provides the constants and formulas that we will receive for test and exams.

https://lavelle.chem.ucla.edu/wp-conten ... ations.pdf

Daria MacAuslan 1H
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Daria MacAuslan 1H » Fri Jan 10, 2020 3:55 pm

R is the Universal Gas Constant. It is described in the textbook as well. The values can be in different units of pressure. It is 8.314 J/molK, 0.082L-atm/ molK, or 62.36L-torr/molK.

Sally Qiu 2E
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Sally Qiu 2E » Fri Jan 10, 2020 3:57 pm

R is a gas constant and the numerical value depends on the units being used to measure the gas

Hannah Pham
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Hannah Pham » Fri Jan 10, 2020 4:06 pm

R is the Ideal Gas Constant which has the value of 8.314J/molK.

Angela Prince 1J
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Angela Prince 1J » Fri Jan 10, 2020 4:15 pm

R is the ideal gas constant, which will probably be given to us on a test/exam.

Kylie Lim 4G
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Kylie Lim 4G » Fri Jan 10, 2020 4:25 pm

R is a gas constant that is on the constants and formulas sheet that we get on tests (also on Lavelle's website)
R= 8.314 J·K-1·mol-1 = 8.206 x 10-2 L·atm·K-1·mol-1 = 8.314 x 10-2 L·bar·K-1·mol-1= 62.364 L·Torr·K-1·mol-1

Edmund Zhi 2B
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Edmund Zhi 2B » Fri Jan 10, 2020 5:36 pm

There are different values and units that will vary based on the units of the other variables given in a certain equation. We will probably get these on the formula sheet just like lavelle's 14a

Anthony Hatashita 4H
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Anthony Hatashita 4H » Fri Jan 10, 2020 10:44 pm

It's a constant and should be given with any exams so I don't think we need to worry too much about it.

kausalya_1k
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby kausalya_1k » Fri Jan 10, 2020 10:51 pm

The R represents the ideal gas constant.
Depending on units, it is equal to R=8.314 J·K-1·mol-1= = 8.206 x 10-2 L·atm·K-1·mol-1 = 8.314 x 10-2 L·bar·K-1·mol-1.

faithkim1L
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby faithkim1L » Fri Jan 10, 2020 11:51 pm

R is the gas constant. I believe it will be given on the equation/constant sheet on tests.

lauraxie2e
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby lauraxie2e » Sat Jan 11, 2020 1:00 pm

it is the gas constant and can either be seen as 8.314 J/mol·K or 0.082057 L⋅atm/mol⋅K

Donavin Collins 1F
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Donavin Collins 1F » Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:01 pm

R is a gas constant and should be given to you on the formula sheet for tests.

Jesse Anderson-Ramirez 3I
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Jesse Anderson-Ramirez 3I » Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:10 pm

R is the gas constant with a value of 8.314 (J)/((Mol)(K))

Andres Merlos 2L
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Andres Merlos 2L » Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:56 pm

R refers to the gas constant which depends on the units you are using for your equation.

Kayla Maldonado 1C
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Kayla Maldonado 1C » Sat Jan 11, 2020 4:39 pm

Millicent Navarro 1I wrote:PV=nRT is the Ideal Gas Law equation. To answer your question, the R is the ideal gas law constant and there are varying corresponding values (for the most part, problems will specify which value to use.) Some examples can include bar or atm.

When do we use the ideal gas law equation? How does it relate to Kp?

Rosa Munoz 2E
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Rosa Munoz 2E » Sun Jan 12, 2020 1:49 pm

The R is a constant, you can find it on the equation sheet. Just pay attention to which unit of pressure they are using.

JohannaPerezH2F
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby JohannaPerezH2F » Sun Jan 12, 2020 2:54 pm

R is the gas constant and it equals 8.314 J / mol·K.

Matthew Chan 1B
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Matthew Chan 1B » Sun Jan 12, 2020 2:59 pm

R just represents the gas constant, which is 8.314 J.mol-1.K-1

Alfred Barrion 2H
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Alfred Barrion 2H » Sun Jan 12, 2020 3:52 pm

R is the gas constant, and depending on the units you have in your problem you have to choose a certain R value.
R = 8.314 J·K-1·mol-1 = 8.206 x 10-2 L·atm·K-1·mol-1 = 8.314 x 10-2 L·bar·K-1·mol-1
= 62.364 L·Torr·K-1·mol-1

Emil Velasco 1H
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Emil Velasco 1H » Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:38 pm

R is the gas constant, should be found on the equations sheet

Andrea_Torres
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Re: R in PV=nRT

Postby Andrea_Torres » Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:43 pm

The R in PV=nRT stands for the gas constant and its units are 8.314 J/mol·K.


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