Polyprotic Acids

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605110118
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Polyprotic Acids

Postby 605110118 » Wed Jan 22, 2020 8:06 pm

What is the difference between k1 and k2?

Renee Grange 1I
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Re: Polyprotic Acids

Postby Renee Grange 1I » Wed Jan 22, 2020 8:23 pm

Polyprotic acids are acids that dissociate more than once. K1 is the value of K for the first ionization. K2 is the K value for the second ionization.

Rohit Ghosh 4F
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Re: Polyprotic Acids

Postby Rohit Ghosh 4F » Thu Jan 23, 2020 12:35 pm

As the acid loses a proton and then another proton, the k values for each step are different.

Emma Popescu 1L
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Re: Polyprotic Acids

Postby Emma Popescu 1L » Fri Jan 24, 2020 2:21 pm

Polyprotic acids can donate more than one proton. Protons are donated with the acidity constant (K) decreasing significantly with each proton lost Ka1>>ka2>>ka3. However, for most polyprotic acids (except Sulfuric acid), only the first deprotonation (Ka1) should be taken into account since all subsequent deprotonations do not affect pH significantly so are ignored.

Catherine Daye 1L
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Re: Polyprotic Acids

Postby Catherine Daye 1L » Fri Jan 24, 2020 5:43 pm

K1 is when an acid/base dissociates for the first time. K2 is when the resulting conjugate base/acid from the previous reaction dissociates a second time.

Renee Grange 1I
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Re: Polyprotic Acids

Postby Renee Grange 1I » Tue Feb 18, 2020 9:40 am

Polyprotic acids dissociate more than once. K1 is the K value for the first dissociation and K2 is that for the second dissociation.

Robin Cadd 1D
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Re: Polyprotic Acids

Postby Robin Cadd 1D » Tue Feb 18, 2020 11:08 am

605110118 wrote:What is the difference between k1 and k2?

K1 is the equilibrium constant for the first dissociation; K2 is the equilibrium constant for the second dissociation. K1>>>K2


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