Platinum in cell diagram

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Abigail Menchaca_1H
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Platinum in cell diagram

Postby Abigail Menchaca_1H » Mon Feb 24, 2020 10:29 am

Why do we use Platinum when drawing the cell diagram?

Paul Hage 2G
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Re: Platinum in cell diagram

Postby Paul Hage 2G » Mon Feb 24, 2020 10:33 am

Platinum is introduced into the cell diagram when there are no solid metals as part of the anode or cathode of the cell diagram. It serves as an inert electrode (provides a surface for the transfer of electrons, but does not affect or participate in the redox reaction).

Shail Avasthi 2C
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Re: Platinum in cell diagram

Postby Shail Avasthi 2C » Mon Feb 24, 2020 12:01 pm

You need a solid metal to conduct the flow of electrons when both compounds of your anode or cathode are in aqueous solution. Platinum is used when it is not involved in the chemistry of the galvanic cell, and therefore will not be oxidized or reduced while acting as a conducting metal.

Jack Riley 4f
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Re: Platinum in cell diagram

Postby Jack Riley 4f » Mon Feb 24, 2020 12:02 pm

You need a metal to conduct the electrons and platinum is inert and doesn't interfere with the redox reaction

Abhi Vempati 2H
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Re: Platinum in cell diagram

Postby Abhi Vempati 2H » Mon Feb 24, 2020 2:34 pm

In addition to what everyone is saying, there was a specific example done in lecture.

In his example last Friday, Professor Lavelle showed a cell with copper and iron in it. In the copper half reaction, Cu(s) was present, so we can use the solid itself as an electrode. However, in the iron half reaction, there was Fe2+(aq) and Fe3+(aq). There's no solid to act as an electrode, which is why we need something like platinum to be that electrode. Hope this helps!

charleejohnson1L
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Re: Platinum in cell diagram

Postby charleejohnson1L » Mon Feb 24, 2020 3:08 pm

Paul Hage 2G wrote:Platinum is introduced into the cell diagram when there are no solid metals as part of the anode or cathode of the cell diagram. It serves as an inert electrode (provides a surface for the transfer of electrons, but does not affect or participate in the redox reaction).

^^ this! also when you write it with the | and ||, it will always go on the ends :) I hope this helps!

Bilal Pandit 1J
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Re: Platinum in cell diagram

Postby Bilal Pandit 1J » Mon Feb 24, 2020 4:56 pm

You always need something solid that can act as the actual electrode, so you would use a metal like Pt as that electrode.

pmokh14B
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Platinum in cell diagram

Postby pmokh14B » Mon Feb 24, 2020 6:45 pm

Because you need a material that can act as an electrode but not be involved in the reaction.

Robin Cadd 1D
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Re: Platinum in cell diagram

Postby Robin Cadd 1D » Mon Feb 24, 2020 7:14 pm

Paul Hage 2G wrote:Platinum is introduced into the cell diagram when there are no solid metals as part of the anode or cathode of the cell diagram. It serves as an inert electrode (provides a surface for the transfer of electrons, but does not affect or participate in the redox reaction).

Another important point to note: platinum is not the only inert electrode. Graphite can also serve this same purpose, but it’s less common.

Katie Bart 1I
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Re: Platinum in cell diagram

Postby Katie Bart 1I » Mon Feb 24, 2020 11:14 pm

Could you use other metals? Or only Pt?

ABombino_2J
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Re: Platinum in cell diagram

Postby ABombino_2J » Tue Feb 25, 2020 4:05 pm

Graphite and gold are some other metals that also work in place of platinum.


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