G=-nFE equation  [ENDORSED]


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Alicia Lin 2F
Posts: 83
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:17 am

G=-nFE equation

Postby Alicia Lin 2F » Tue Mar 03, 2020 5:23 pm

does the equation G=-nFE still apply to nonstandard values? It only specifies the standard values on the equation sheet.

Chem_Mod
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Re: G=-nFE equation

Postby Chem_Mod » Tue Mar 03, 2020 7:27 pm

The equation delta Go = -nFEo applies to standard conditions.

The equation delta G = -nFE applies to non-standard conditions.

Matthew ILG 1L
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Re: G=-nFE equation

Postby Matthew ILG 1L » Tue Mar 03, 2020 10:12 pm

Will we lose points on the test or final if we forget to include the degree sign?

205291012
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Joined: Mon Nov 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: G=-nFE equation

Postby 205291012 » Tue Mar 03, 2020 10:26 pm

Standard will have that naught or little circle next to G and E. It means standard conditions (solutions are 1M, gases are 1bar or 1atm, solids and liquids are in pure form, temp is 25 degrees celsius). If it isn't standard then there is no circle.

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Re: G=-nFE equation  [ENDORSED]

Postby Chem_Mod » Tue Mar 03, 2020 10:41 pm

Matthew ILG 1L wrote:Will we lose points on the test or final if we forget to include the degree sign?


Yes because they are different and mean different things.
Its the equivalent of saying your altitude is 2000 ft when you are at sea level.


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