Distortion

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Sarah Salam 1J
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:31 pm

Distortion

Postby Sarah Salam 1J » Sun Nov 08, 2020 7:44 am

What does it mean for something to be highly distorted? I know that it relates to polarization, and the model with the ion and cation in the lecture helped me understand what is happening, but I don't understand what is making that happen or how to recognize it. Does this only refer to electrons and electron clouds?

Hayden Lee 1C
Posts: 94
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:57 pm

Re: Distortion

Postby Hayden Lee 1C » Sun Nov 08, 2020 12:32 pm

Hi!

When electrons in an atom are distorted, this is due to the positive charge of another element attracting the electrons of said atom. For example, in an ionic bond, the cation exerts an electrostatic attraction on the electrons of the surrounding anion. The positive charge of the cation attracts the electrons of the anion, distorting the electron cloud. More distortion occurs if the cation has high polarizing power (if it is small and highly charged in a positive manner) or if the anion is highly polarizable (large, electron-rich anion).

Rajshree 1F
Posts: 106
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:32 pm

Re: Distortion

Postby Rajshree 1F » Sun Nov 08, 2020 2:39 pm

the amount distortion is based upon the size of the anion. the bigger the atom and therefore the number of electrons it has, the more distorted it will be when attracted to a cation.

Valerie Doan 3I
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Re: Distortion

Postby Valerie Doan 3I » Sun Nov 08, 2020 3:33 pm

Hayden and Rajshree did a really good job at explaining distortion and the polarizability of electrons. Here is an image that can help you visualize the concept:

derr - Copy - Copy.png


When electrons are highly distorted, they are described as highly polarizable because the outer electrons of the anion are not held tightly so they are more easily pulled towards the shared region by the cation.

Ellison Gonzales 1H
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:00 pm

Re: Distortion

Postby Ellison Gonzales 1H » Sun Nov 08, 2020 7:59 pm

What about anions that are more polarizable classifies them as covalent? In other words, why is it that anions that are pulled into the shared region are classified as covalent?

isha dis3d
Posts: 101
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:47 pm

Re: Distortion

Postby isha dis3d » Sun Nov 08, 2020 9:02 pm

I think the reason anions that are pulled into the shared region are classified as covalent is because a covalent bond indicates that two electrons are being shared by two molecules and unlike an ionic bond, are completely transferred over to the other molecule. In the shared region, the two electrons are shared by the molecules so they are classified as covalent.

Lily Mohtashami
Posts: 148
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:34 pm

Re: Distortion

Postby Lily Mohtashami » Mon Nov 09, 2020 2:13 pm

distortion occurs when the cation is polarizing and attracting electrons because the ion is positive. The polarizable anion has electrons that are being pulled which forms a distorted electron cloud. The more distortion occurs the more the bond has covalent characteristics and the more soluble it will be.

Hope this helps :)

FionaHunter21
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:37 pm

Re: Distortion

Postby FionaHunter21 » Thu Nov 12, 2020 3:25 pm

Is an anion always the atom that is polarizable and the cation is what can have high polarizing ability?

Ellison Gonzales 1H
Posts: 105
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:00 pm

Re: Distortion

Postby Ellison Gonzales 1H » Sun Nov 15, 2020 10:00 pm

FionaHunter21 wrote:Is an anion always the atom that is polarizable and the cation is what can have high polarizing ability?

Hi!
Yes, “polarizable” applies to anions and “polarizing power”/“polarizability” applies to cations


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