repulsion strength

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705340227
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repulsion strength

Postby 705340227 » Sun Nov 22, 2020 7:57 pm

Why do lone pair electrons have a greater repulsion strength than bonded elctrons?

Anna Martin 2l
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Re: repulsion strength

Postby Anna Martin 2l » Sun Nov 22, 2020 8:01 pm

I think that lone pairs have a greater repulsion strength because they occupy more volume!

Kelly Tran 1J
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Re: repulsion strength

Postby Kelly Tran 1J » Sun Nov 22, 2020 8:01 pm

The electron repulsion between lone pairs is stronger than the repulsion between bonding pairs since lone pairs occupy a larger volume. In other words, since lone pairs occupy a larger volume, they are able to push down on the bonded pairs, which is why lone-lone pair repulsion is stronger compared to bonding-bonding pair.

Margia Adriano 2A
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Re: repulsion strength

Postby Margia Adriano 2A » Sun Nov 22, 2020 8:03 pm

Hi! I believe this is because bonded electrons are more localized, specifically to the orbital/bonding region in between two different atoms and is further from the nucleus than lone pair electrons. The lone pairs are closer/attracted to one nucleus/atom. Therefore, there is more repulsion from the lone pair electrons. Hope this helps!

Justin Zhang_1A
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Re: repulsion strength

Postby Justin Zhang_1A » Sun Nov 22, 2020 8:39 pm

Lone pairs occupy a larger volume than bonds do, so they push down and exert more force on the other bonded pairs.

Ellison Gonzales 1H
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Re: repulsion strength

Postby Ellison Gonzales 1H » Sun Nov 22, 2020 9:04 pm

Just to clarify, lone pair electrons have more repulsions so therefore that angle is wider, correct? In that case, we just have to know that concept? Or is there certain angle degree that is associated with lone pair repulsion?

Chanel Mao 3D
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Re: repulsion strength

Postby Chanel Mao 3D » Sun Nov 22, 2020 9:12 pm

Ellison Gonzales 3F wrote:Just to clarify, lone pair electrons have more repulsions so therefore that angle is wider, correct? In that case, we just have to know that concept? Or is there certain angle degree that is associated with lone pair repulsion?


Hi! Yes you are correct, lone pair repulsion is greater than bonding pair repulsion, so the angle of the remaining bonds are smaller. The angle degree for lone pair repulsions tend to vary, so I think just knowing the concept should be sufficient. Hope this helps!

Ellison Gonzales 1H
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Re: repulsion strength

Postby Ellison Gonzales 1H » Sun Nov 22, 2020 9:20 pm

Chanel Mao 2F wrote:
Ellison Gonzales 3F wrote:Just to clarify, lone pair electrons have more repulsions so therefore that angle is wider, correct? In that case, we just have to know that concept? Or is there certain angle degree that is associated with lone pair repulsion?


Hi! Yes you are correct, lone pair repulsion is greater than bonding pair repulsion, so the angle of the remaining bonds are smaller. The angle degree for lone pair repulsions tend to vary, so I think just knowing the concept should be sufficient. Hope this helps!


Oh good!Yes thank you so much, Chanel

Chudi Onyedika 3A
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Re: repulsion strength

Postby Chudi Onyedika 3A » Sun Nov 22, 2020 9:24 pm

Lone pairs have more freedom and are able to occupy more space compared to bonded electrons.

Brandon McClelland3L
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Re: repulsion strength

Postby Brandon McClelland3L » Sun Nov 22, 2020 9:37 pm

The position of lone pairs is more variable than the position of electrons in bonds. As a result, electrons in lone pairs can move close to electrons in bonds and repel them, while electrons in bonds can't move as close to where the electrons in lone pairs usually are and repel them as much.

DavidTabib 3H
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:06 pm

Re: repulsion strength

Postby DavidTabib 3H » Sun Nov 22, 2020 9:48 pm

Since lone pairs occupy more volume, they cause more repulsion.


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