Lewis Structures

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JosephLew3C
Posts: 21
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 3:00 pm

Lewis Structures

Postby JosephLew3C » Sun Oct 16, 2016 7:14 pm

On page 80 of the course reader it shows that a single bond length is 1.40 angstroms and that a double bond length is 1.20 angstroms, but it doesn't state the length of a triple bond does anyone know the exact measurement?

Ryan Petrecca 1L
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:59 pm

Re: Lewis Structures

Postby Ryan Petrecca 1L » Sun Oct 16, 2016 7:29 pm

I don't know the exact length of a triple bond, but it's not that important to know the exact length of single, double, and triple bonds as these lengths vary between molecules. What is important is that bond length decreases as it goes from single>double>triple.

Joslyn_Santana_2B
Posts: 51
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:58 pm

Re: Lewis Structures

Postby Joslyn_Santana_2B » Wed Oct 19, 2016 11:02 pm

Hi, Does anyone know why for Xenon (Xe) can break the octet guideline?

I wrote out the electron configuration for it thinking it would help me see it visually, but all the d,s, and p orbitals are full. I am not seeing why it can break the octet rule.

Joslyn_Santana_2B
Posts: 51
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:58 pm

Re: Lewis Structures

Postby Joslyn_Santana_2B » Wed Oct 19, 2016 11:16 pm

Here is an example of Xe breaking the octet rule.
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Jazmin Martin 1D
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Lewis Structures

Postby Jazmin Martin 1D » Fri Oct 21, 2016 10:33 am

Hey guys,
How do we know when an element goes in the middle of the Lewis structure. Does it have to do with the ionization energy? For example, ONF. Or any combination of three elements.
Thank you,
Jazmin

Tatum_Bernat_1E
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 3:00 am

Re: Lewis Structures

Postby Tatum_Bernat_1E » Fri Oct 21, 2016 12:23 pm

Regarding Jasmin's question... Page 79 of the course reader instructs us to choose the atom with the lowest ionization energy as the central atom. The nitrogen in ammonium would be the central atom, because of its low ionization energy compared to hydrogen's. (Not to mention hydrogen is never the central atom)
-Tatum

Shirley_Zhang 3O
Posts: 35
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm

Re: Lewis Structures

Postby Shirley_Zhang 3O » Fri Oct 21, 2016 12:39 pm

Joslyn_Santana_3A wrote:Here is an example of Xe breaking the octet rule.


Yes, you are right that both the S and P orbitals are filled, but Xe also has 5d orbitals that is shown in period 6 on the periodic table, so the extra pairs of bonds occupy the d-orbitals


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