Text Book Problem 2.29 (d)

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Harjot Manku 1C
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Joined: Fri Sep 20, 2013 3:00 am

Text Book Problem 2.29 (d)

Postby Harjot Manku 1C » Tue Jul 11, 2017 3:39 pm

How many electron can have the following quantum numbers in an atom:
n=2

To find 'l' you use (n-1) which gives you "1" that makes it a p-orbital (0,1). 'ml' is -1,0,1. That means that there are 6 electrons that can have that quantum number. But the book answer says there are 8 electrons. How is it 8 electrons?

Paul Wong1B
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Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2017 11:39 am

Re: Text Book Problem 2.29 (d)

Postby Paul Wong1B » Tue Jul 11, 2017 3:49 pm

The question is asking about how many electrons can have the quantum number of n=2, meaning the 2nd shell. Since the 2nd shell possesses only s and p subshells, those subshells are the only ones that can have the number n=2. We learned that s- subshells have one orbital and that each orbital can hold up to two electrons (Pauli Exclusion Principle). Furthermore, the p- subshell has 3 orbitals that can hold up to 2 electrons each, producing 6 electrons. With 2 electrons in the 2s subshell and 6 in the 2p subshell, the answer is 8.

Johana Jeon 1A
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Joined: Sun Feb 12, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Text Book Problem 2.29 (d)

Postby Johana Jeon 1A » Tue Jul 11, 2017 4:06 pm

It's 8 because n = 2 is s & p orbitals
s can hold 2 + p can hold 6 = 8

Harjot Manku 1C
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Sep 20, 2013 3:00 am

Re: Text Book Problem 2.29 (d)

Postby Harjot Manku 1C » Tue Jul 11, 2017 4:20 pm

I see. So if you're given the quantum number "l" like in problem "a" then there would be 6 electron because it specifically asks for that orbital?


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