Bent or linear?

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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Kristina Nguyen 1C
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Bent or linear?

Postby Kristina Nguyen 1C » Sat Nov 18, 2017 1:36 pm

Would a molecule with a double/triple bond on one side of a central atom and a single bond on the other side of that atom be linear or bent?

Diego Zavala 2I
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Re: Bent or linear?

Postby Diego Zavala 2I » Sat Nov 18, 2017 2:05 pm

I believe the shape would depend on where the lone pairs of electrons are placed and not be affected by single or double bonds
Last edited by Diego Zavala 2I on Sat Nov 18, 2017 7:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Rita Dang 3D
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Re: Bent or linear?

Postby Rita Dang 3D » Sat Nov 18, 2017 4:50 pm

I think it would be linear if there are no lone pairs on the central atom

Ozhen Atoyan 1F
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Re: Bent or linear?

Postby Ozhen Atoyan 1F » Sat Nov 18, 2017 5:24 pm

If the central atom does not have lone pairs then it would be linear. Since there is a lack of lone pairs the other elements would not be pushed down. However, if there was a lone pair on the central atom, it would repel the other two elements. In this case they, would be pushed down and bent. Another way to call this is angular.

Jennie Fox 1D
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Re: Bent or linear?

Postby Jennie Fox 1D » Sat Nov 18, 2017 6:50 pm

The shape depends on the number of lone pairs as well as their placement on the molecule.

Karan Singh Lecture 3
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Re: Bent or linear?

Postby Karan Singh Lecture 3 » Sat Nov 18, 2017 9:07 pm

Yeah, I agree, if the central atom does not have any lone pairs, then it would be linear.

Christy Zhao 1H
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Re: Bent or linear?

Postby Christy Zhao 1H » Sun Nov 19, 2017 1:53 am

Adding on, it would be linear because single and multiple bonds are treated as the same in the VSEPR model.

Cassandra Mullen 1E
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Re: Bent or linear?

Postby Cassandra Mullen 1E » Sun Nov 19, 2017 10:07 am

An example of a linear shape with a triple bond on one side and a single bond on the other side is hydrogen cyanide (HCN). A triple bond connects C to N and a single bond connects H to C. It has no lone pairs and 2 VSEPR regions, so the molecular shape is linear.

Ashley Fallon 3C
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Re: Bent or linear?

Postby Ashley Fallon 3C » Sun Nov 19, 2017 7:10 pm

If there are no lone pairs then it would be linear because it is lacking the electron repulsion from the lone pairs.

StephanieRusnak
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Re: Bent or linear?

Postby StephanieRusnak » Sun Nov 19, 2017 8:21 pm

geometry doesnt depend on whether bonds are double/triple but on the electron domains so if there are no lone pairs on the central atom it is linear

Abigail Urbina 1K
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Re: Bent or linear?

Postby Abigail Urbina 1K » Sun Nov 19, 2017 8:54 pm

It would be linear if there are no lone pairs of electrons on the central atom. This is because the lone pairs are responsible for any repulsion between themselves and the bonded electrons. The bent shape/structure of any molecule can be attributed to this repulsion phenomenon. A linear shape would make the bonded electrons and lone electrons closer to each other whereas the bent shape distances them apart and can lessen the repulsion.

Michelle Lu 1F
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Re: Bent or linear?

Postby Michelle Lu 1F » Sun Nov 19, 2017 9:45 pm

If there are no lone pairs on the central atom, then the shape of the molecule will be linear. However, if there are lone pairs on the central atom, the electron repulsion that they will create with the other bonds connecting the central atom will cause the shape to be bent.


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