H+ as Lewis acid/base  [ENDORSED]

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Akash_Kapoor_1L
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H+ as Lewis acid/base

Postby Akash_Kapoor_1L » Sun Dec 03, 2017 4:39 pm

When H+ is transferred in a reaction, is it concerted a bronsted or Lewis acid/base reaction? Is H+ always considered a Lewis acid?

Mika Sonnleitner 1A
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Re: H+ as Lewis acid/base  [ENDORSED]

Postby Mika Sonnleitner 1A » Sun Dec 03, 2017 4:53 pm

A Lewis acid is a compound that accepts an electron pair. So, the H+ ion could accept an electron pair from another compound (base) to form a bond. A Bronsted Acid is a compound that donates a proton. The H+ ion would be accepted by another compound (base) to form a bond. Essentially, H+ can be a Lewis or Bronsted acid, it just depends how you explain the interaction. If you are considering how the protons move, then you would refer to a Bronsted acid/base. If you are considering how the electrons move, then you would refer to a Lewis acid/base.

Yiwei Zhou 2I
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Re: H+ as Lewis acid/base

Postby Yiwei Zhou 2I » Sun Dec 03, 2017 5:06 pm

It is a Bronsted acid/base reaction if H+ is referred as a proton.


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