Delta G not






Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Leah Thomas 2E
Posts: 51
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

Delta G not

Postby Leah Thomas 2E » Sun Feb 04, 2018 1:29 pm

Can someone explain the difference between ∆G and ΔG° conceptually. Why don't we always need to calculate for ΔG°?

Cyianna 2F
Posts: 34
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:04 am

Re: Delta G not

Postby Cyianna 2F » Sun Feb 04, 2018 1:51 pm

It's just a difference of values, the concept of are still the same. I think that it just depends of the conditions of the reaction. I'm not entirely sure though, that's a good question.

Jason Muljadi 2C
Posts: 62
Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2017 3:01 am

Re: Delta G not

Postby Jason Muljadi 2C » Sun Feb 04, 2018 1:54 pm

ΔG° is in standard condition, so you would have to calculate ΔH° and ΔS°, just like you would in the regular Gibbs Free Energy equation.

Jakob von Morgenland 2C
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Delta G not

Postby Jakob von Morgenland 2C » Sun Feb 04, 2018 1:56 pm

∆G° is considered the standard free energy change of a reaction, while ∆G is considered the free energy change of a reaction. Remember, standard free energy change implies that the reactants and products are in their standard states at 1 atm and generally 25 celsius.

Ivy Lu 1C
Posts: 54
Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Delta G not

Postby Ivy Lu 1C » Sun Feb 04, 2018 3:09 pm

∆G° is the standard free energy of the reaction. This means that the reactants and products are at their standard state: 1 atm for gases and 1 M of aqueous solutions, typically at 25°C. ∆G is just the free energy of the reaction that doesn't have to be under the standard state conditions.

Diego Zavala 2I
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Delta G not

Postby Diego Zavala 2I » Sun Feb 04, 2018 3:41 pm

is the standard free energy change in a reaction at 1 bar for gases or 1M for solutions. Because 1 bar is roughly equivalent to 1 atm, we can use the values of the standard free energy for most reactions


Return to “Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests