internal energy

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Naana Boateng 1I
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

internal energy

Postby Naana Boateng 1I » Tue Jan 16, 2018 8:56 pm

How do you find the change of internal energy?

Curtis Tam 1J
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Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am

Re: internal energy

Postby Curtis Tam 1J » Tue Jan 16, 2018 8:58 pm

deltaU=q+w

Amanda Wu 2C
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am

Re: internal energy

Postby Amanda Wu 2C » Tue Jan 16, 2018 9:57 pm

The change in internal energy of a system (Delta U) is the sum of the heat (q) added (q > 0) to or
removed (q < 0) from the system and the work (w) done on (w > 0) or by (w < 0) the system. In short, delta U = q + w.

Beza Ayalew 1I
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: internal energy

Postby Beza Ayalew 1I » Wed Jan 17, 2018 1:13 am

Sorry this is a little off topic but does this make Internal energy, or the change in internal energy not a state function because both heat and work are not state functions?

Lisa Tang 1C
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Re: internal energy

Postby Lisa Tang 1C » Wed Jan 17, 2018 9:28 am

Internal energy still is considered a state function despite both heat and work being path-dependent. I believe that because internal energy is not path-dependent (and only state-dependent), it does not matter what combination of heat and work is present to sum to the internal energy.

Sirajbir Sodhi 2K
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Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am

Re: internal energy

Postby Sirajbir Sodhi 2K » Wed Jan 17, 2018 1:48 pm

Internal energy is a state property because it is a property intrinsic to a system. And as said above, the value of internal energy is not dependent on how that value was reached -- it is path independent.


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