Moles  [ENDORSED]

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FrankieClarke2C
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Moles

Postby FrankieClarke2C » Sat Oct 06, 2018 3:27 pm

While looking at this equation: Fe2O3(s)+ 3 CO2(g) ------> 2 Fe(s) + 3 CO2(g)
it implies that 2 mol Fe ~ 1 mol Fe2O3

How does this imply that 2 mol of iron equals 1 mol of the compound?

ArielKim3C
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Moles

Postby ArielKim3C » Sat Oct 06, 2018 4:40 pm

I believe that it is implying that there are two moles of iron for every one mole of the compound, instead of two moles equalling one mole of the compound.

Luc Lorain 1L
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Moles  [ENDORSED]

Postby Luc Lorain 1L » Sat Oct 06, 2018 4:53 pm

For this problem it is important to look at both the subscripts and balancing coefficients involved with the products and reactants. I think that its possible that you just overlooked the subscript 2 on Fe2O3, but if not I can explain in more detail.

Since a mole is a numerical quantity (like 5, 6, or 100), one mole of a molecule that contains many atoms can be broken up into many moles of smaller compounds or single atoms. In this instance there are 2 Fe atoms per one molecule of Fe2O3. One mole of Fe2O3 is equal to 6.022 x 1023 molecules of Fe2O3. Since there are 2 Fe atoms per each molecule of the compound, there should be 2 mols of Fe on the products side of the equation, either bound together in a compound or as free atoms, as is the case here.

The one part of the problem I do not understand is the disappearance of of the oxygen from Fe2O3, as there is no oxygen in the products' side of the equation to balance. This would break the law of conservation of mass, and is in all cases incorrect. Is there more context to the problem, or perhaps something left out of the problem?

Anjali_Kumar1F
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Moles

Postby Anjali_Kumar1F » Sat Oct 06, 2018 4:55 pm

Its because that is the ratio. That is a balanced equation and 1 ratio Fe2O3 to 2 Fe because that what the formula is telling us.

Noh_Jasmine_1J
Posts: 71
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Re: Moles

Postby Noh_Jasmine_1J » Thu Oct 11, 2018 4:15 pm

This is just showing the ratio of the Fe to the compound for that specific chemical reaction. The molar ratio could be different for other reactions

Selina Bellin 2B
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Moles

Postby Selina Bellin 2B » Thu Oct 11, 2018 4:17 pm

i think it says that the 1 compound yields 2 moles of Fe

vaishali 1D
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: Moles

Postby vaishali 1D » Sun Oct 14, 2018 11:18 am

FrankieClarke4B wrote:While looking at this equation: Fe2O3(s)+ 3 CO2(g) ------> 2 Fe(s) + 3 CO2(g)
it implies that 2 mol Fe ~ 1 mol Fe2O3

How does this imply that 2 mol of iron equals 1 mol of the compound?


It's a ratio. It is saying that there are two moles of iron for every one mole of the compound Fe2O3.


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