Temperature and Equilibrium

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Tamera Scott 1G
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Temperature and Equilibrium

Postby Tamera Scott 1G » Wed Jan 09, 2019 4:22 pm

I understand that raising the temperature of an equilibrium will tend to shift its composition in the endothermic direction of the reaction, but how do you know which side of the reaction is endothermic and exothermic?

Nada AbouHaiba 1I
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am
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Re: Temperature and Equilibrium

Postby Nada AbouHaiba 1I » Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:18 pm

Usually you can tell by looking at whether or not the reaction is overall endothermic or exothermic. Usually with problems like that they should give you a delta H or just tell you.

bonnie_schmitz_1F
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Re: Temperature and Equilibrium

Postby bonnie_schmitz_1F » Wed Jan 09, 2019 7:09 pm

In general how can you tell if determine if a reaction is exothermic or endothermic?

whitney_2C
Posts: 74
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Temperature and Equilibrium

Postby whitney_2C » Wed Jan 09, 2019 7:20 pm

bonnie_schmitz_1F wrote:In general how can you tell if determine if a reaction is exothermic or endothermic?


You would have to calculate the enthalpy or of the reaction to be able to know if a reaction is endothermic or exothermic. If the enthalpy is negative then it is exothermic and if it is positive then it is endothermic. We haven't gotten into thermodynamics yet but there are a bunch of ways to calculate the enthalpy of a reaction that we'll find out about later.


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