Why can CO3(2-) be a mono/bidentate ligand

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Saira Purewal 3E
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Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2014 2:02 pm

Why can CO3(2-) be a mono/bidentate ligand

Postby Saira Purewal 3E » Tue Dec 02, 2014 10:41 am

Why can CO3(2-) be a mono/bidentate ligand?

Patrick Chin 1F
Posts: 45
Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2014 2:02 pm

Re: Why can CO3(2-) be a mono/bidentate ligand

Postby Patrick Chin 1F » Tue Dec 02, 2014 5:53 pm

Normally Carbonate is monodentate, because it only has 120 degrees between its Oxygens, so two oxygens cannot bind to the same metal. However, in some cases carbonate bonds to two different metals, making it bidentate.

Elizabeth Vanderwall 4I
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2014 2:02 pm

Re: Why can CO3(2-) be a mono/bidentate ligand

Postby Elizabeth Vanderwall 4I » Fri Dec 12, 2014 12:13 pm

Are there any other examples of ligands like CO3^2- that are both monodentate and bidentate (depending on the size of the central metal atom)?

NO2- and SO4^2-, which, like CO3^2-, have several oxygens available for binding, are both monodentate only.
Is this because NO2- has a bond angle of <120 & SO4^2- has a bond angle of 109.5?
Is 120 degrees the cutoff for being able to act as a monodentate and bidentate ligand?

Nick Lewis 4F
Posts: 111
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Why can CO3(2-) be a mono/bidentate ligand

Postby Nick Lewis 4F » Sat Dec 07, 2019 9:02 pm

Patrick Chin 1F wrote:Normally Carbonate is monodentate, because it only has 120 degrees between its Oxygens, so two oxygens cannot bind to the same metal. However, in some cases carbonate bonds to two different metals, making it bidentate.



If it is bonding to two different metals, then isn't it not a coordination compound? i thought the denticity was when they "bite" onto the same atom


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