Electron Affinity

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Nina Fukui 2J
Posts: 97
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:43 pm

Electron Affinity

Postby Nina Fukui 2J » Sun Nov 08, 2020 9:27 pm

Can someone explain what electron affinity is? I'm still having a hard time understanding it...

Ivan Chen 2H
Posts: 103
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:48 pm

Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Ivan Chen 2H » Sun Nov 08, 2020 9:45 pm

Electron affinity is a measurement of energy released in attaching an electron to a neutral gas atom/molecule. This helps us determine whether or not an atom/molecule is an electron acceptor or donor

Simrah_Ahmed1J
Posts: 88
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:49 pm

Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Simrah_Ahmed1J » Sun Nov 08, 2020 9:47 pm

To put it simply, it is basically how likely the atom are to "want" another electron (it wants to have full orbital or valence shell of electrons to have a lower overall energy). That's why atoms that are closer to a full outer orbital/shell have a higher electron affinity because they are closer to full than empty and therefore would rather gain another electron to gain their objective of having a valence shell rather than lose an electron to gain the same thing. For example: Fluorine has higher electron affinity than boron because Fluorine "wants" gain an electron in order to have a full valence shell (n=2) whereas Boron would rather lose 3 electrons and just have a full first energy level (n=1) instead of Boron "wanting" to gain 5 electrons in order to have a full valence shell on the second energy level (n=2). That would be much more 'difficult" for boron.

Alejandro Gonzalez 2G
Posts: 77
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:04 pm

Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Alejandro Gonzalez 2G » Sun Nov 08, 2020 9:48 pm

I think electron affinity is basically the likelihood that an atom will gain an electron, based on the amount of energy released when a neutral atom gains an electron.

Emily_Stenzler_2H
Posts: 196
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:02 pm

Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Emily_Stenzler_2H » Sun Nov 08, 2020 9:50 pm

I believe the main idea we need to understand from electron affinity is that it refers to an atom's likelihood of gaining an electron. The more negative an atom's electron affinity is, the greater attraction that atom has for an electron (keep in mind that energy is released every time an electron is added, so it gets more negative).

AlbertGu_2C
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:34 pm

Re: Electron Affinity

Postby AlbertGu_2C » Sun Nov 08, 2020 10:15 pm

Electron affinity measures how inclined an atom is to take on another electron

Samudrala_Vaishnavi 3A
Posts: 98
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:34 pm

Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Samudrala_Vaishnavi 3A » Mon Nov 09, 2020 8:13 am

Electron affinity is the measure of how much an element wants an electron. Elements that are the closest to becoming a noble gas have a high electron affinity since they want to complete their octet more than any of the other elements before it. It can be calculated by finding the difference between the energy of the element without an electron and with an electron (in eV).

Elizabeth Kaplan 3I
Posts: 119
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:32 pm

Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Elizabeth Kaplan 3I » Mon Nov 09, 2020 11:09 pm

Electron affinity is a measurement of how likely an atom is to gain another electron. For example, electron affinity is very high for Group 17 elements, such as F and Cl, because they only need one more electron to complete their octet, so they are very likely to gain another electron. On the other hand, Group 1 elements, such as Na, have low electron affinity because they do not need another electron to complete an octet, instead they want to give up an electron to have an octet.

Jaclyn Dang 3B
Posts: 105
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:02 pm

Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Jaclyn Dang 3B » Mon Nov 09, 2020 11:20 pm

Electron affinity is the measurement of how attracted it another electron. Also known as how likely it is to gain electrons to complete its octet. An important trend to realize is that it increases as you go to the right and up the periodic table.


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